Buying a puppy and avoiding puppy mills

| Monday, April 21, 2008

I don't normally write a lot here, but without my Chewie I figured it was time I addressed this topic. Deciding to get a dog is a big step; when you bring a pup into your life you are committing upwards of ten years to another living being so it shouldn't be taken lightly. If you have the experience and the ability, getting a dog from a shelter or a rescue organization is the most socially responsible thing to do. MARS, the Miniature Aussie Rescue and Support has information about Mini Aussie rescues across the country, and petfinder.com can help you find any kind of dog, of any age, anywhere. Of course, the downside is that these dogs can sometimes come with baggage, but the majority of shelters are very good about describing what owner would be best for each dog. Nonetheless, as Cesar Milan says, dogs live in the now, and a little love and patience can go a long way.

However, if you are like me, and just absolutely need to have a puppy, then it is imperative to make sure that you go to a reputable breeder to avoid helping the advancement of a puppy mill. The reason I got a Miniature Australian Shepherd puppy was because, 1) I hadn't had a dog in over 25 years and I wanted to have the whole experience, and 2) when I saw my first mini Aussie puppy, I knew that was the breed we had to have, and I wanted my own fuzzball! Getting a puppy is a lot of work. There is all the peeing and pooping and getting up 3 times a night, not to mention how hard it is to crate-train when your lil guy or gal is whining or crying. If you still want a puppy, then the first thing is to find breeders. Unfortunately, there are disreputable mini Aussie breeders in Virginia and North Carolina. The trick is to find the breeder before you find the puppy. A good breeder will ask a lot of questions about you, your home and your activity levels. A good breeder will also show you the facilities where she raises her dogs, and the puppies should live inside with the dam. The breeder should be very knowledgeable about the breed, as should you. You, as the buyer should ask about the dam and sire's hips and eyes, and make sure the contract you sign has a health guarantee of at least 2 years. The breeder should also have contact with past buyers and be willing to give you references. No reputable breeder will let you have the puppy before 8 weeks of age, and the breeder should want to be apprised of veterinary care given once the puppy goes home with you. Lastly, never ever buy a dog from a pet store. While you may feel like you are rescuing the dog, you are encouraging puppy mills to produce more puppies.

If you are interested in avoiding the mini Aussie puppy mills in the mid-atlantic region, or finding good breeders, please contact me.

6 comments:

Crystal said...

Great post.

howawesome said...

MORE PUPPY PICTURES. PICTURES CUTE SO MORE PLS. ME LIKEY PUPPIES.

if your breeder writes like that, please do not get the puppy.

DLC said...

Yes, the breeder should know the name of the breed is Mini Aussie not MIMI AUSSIE.

Susan said...

MIMI AUSIES R GRATE DOG. EVERYONE SHOULD HAVE PUPPY! BUY ONE FROM (INSERT PUPPY MILL NAME HERE)!! I HAVE LOTS MIMI AUSIE PUPS!

Meeg said...

Puppy mills are bad.

DLC said...

Yes, Meeg, puppy mills are very bad.